Thursday, July 29, 2010

"Vigna Lazzairasco" Guido Porro Barolo 2005

I picked this wine up when Greg from The Cab Franco Files recommended it--he tasted a bottle this week too. Kermit Lynch imported it--something that we both definitely like. Kermit Lynch has style. I picked it up for 28$ from the LA Wine Company, although I know that it's a fair bit more everywhere else that I looked. You're out of luck if you want to get this wine at that price though--LA Wine Company is out. Guido Porro has a couple of other Barolo's that he makes--a normale, as well as one from the Santa Caterina Vineyard. The Santa Caterina is supposedly more serious than this vineyard, so this represents the mid-level offering. Immediately on opening, it's clear that this is a serious, well made wine. Initially scents of raspberries, tar, and roses. Textbook Barolo. As this wine stays open, the character definitely changes, and gets darker. Plums, a hint of blackberry, anise, tar, and some earthy character all come out on the nose. Similar flavors. Of particular interest is the mouth-feel, which is layered and satiny, before you hit the wall of tannin. I'm surprised by the plumminess, as it isn't something I've ever associated with Barolo in the past. This could be due to my relative inexperience, but plumminess seems to come from riper grapes than something that's a little lighter on the spectrum like cherries. On the other hand, this wine has lots of Barolo character like anise and tar, so maybe I'm just imagining things. Unlike Matt Kramer, I've had more random esoteric varieties than heavy hitters like Barolo! Anyways, clearly, this wine can soften up for a whole lot longer, and is built to age. This is extremely well made and interesting to drink, and a great deal at the price. Thank you very much to Greg, because I wouldn't have picked up this wine otherwise. Definitely an A grade for this one. You aren't going to find much nebbiolo that is this cheap, as well as this good, out there.

2 comments:

CabFrancoPhile said...

Post is up on my blog! Really cool we both got the plum (due to ripeness), tar and anise out of the wine. I guess while our likes and dislikes aren't identical, our palates aren't too disparate. And that's why we read tasting notes instead of just point scores . . . .

Jeff said...

The plum was definitely over the top. Maybe we just speak the same language. I didn't get that when I first started drinking wine...I can remember looking up reviews just to see if I was "getting the wine right." That was before I realized that different people smell things differently and that there are differences in how person A and person B describe the same thing. When you really start to think about it, it's really weird how people evaluate wines and talk about them. It's such a bizarre lexicon.