Friday, January 22, 2010

Jacuss "Fuc e Flamis" Schioppettino 2005


Sarah and I are obsessed with Italy. Sarah lived in Rome in 2004; I went to visit her, and we haven't been back since. I don't really know why--we definitely could have before, we just haven't. Anyways, yesterday we bought tickets to go spend a little over two weeks in Rome this Spring. We are extremely excited to eat and drink our way through Rome and perhaps some of the surrounding areas, like Viterbo, as well. I am excited to see some of the things that I haven't gotten a chance to see before--like Villa Borghese. To celebrate, I opened a bottle of Schioppettino because Rome was the first place that I discovered Schioppettino. From Ermacora, to be specific, at a cultural association called Il Tajut.

I picked this bottle up at Wine Expo in Santa Monica. 36$, so a little pricey. Jacuss is mainly famous for their white wines. Their website is pretty much all in Italian, so I can't tell too much about what the whole "Fuc e Flamis" thing. Single vineyard, maybe? Perhaps someone with a command of Italian can enlighten me. This wine reminds me of the other Schioppettino based wines that I've had--lots of pepper, earth, mineral, and red berry scents on the nose. Reminds me a little of Cab Franc. Lots of acidity built around a fairly light frame and not much of a finish. Fairly subtle, I would say, although it does have some good intensity of flavor. This wine is unapologetically Italian, and meant to be a compliment to food--it's not made in a blockbuster, super extracted style, has a lot of acids, low alcohol (13% ABV) and is from a whacky indigenous grape varietal. Went great with a more "white wine friendly" risotto of leftover roast chicken, roasted garlic, and roasted broccoli. Such is the power of acidity. A fun wine to try, but not a great deal by any means. If you can find it, I would recommend the Ermacora over this since it's about half the price and is a little bit more interesting. C   

Sarah wanted some more wine, so I cracked open a bottle of Il Conte D'Alba Moscato d'Asti that I got as a gift from a vendor. 9$ online. Nothing wrong with Moscato--it has its' time and place and can be fun to drink--but it's super sweet. 5.5% ABV. Tropical and limey, frizzante, extra sweet. Great with blue cheese that I drizzled a bit of honey on with some crackers. Overall, not really my style, but still OK for drinking. with some cheese or fresh fruit. If I were you, I'd grab a riesling instead. C-

4 comments:

Joshiemac said...

Perhaps Fuc e Flamis are latin for the italian fuoco (fire) and fiamma (flame).

Jeff said...

Thanks for the tip...I would imagine you're right, but then how do you explain what is most likely a leaf on the front? It's completely incongruent. When you try and Google "fuc," you obviously get a lot of references to "fuck," none of which are particularly helpful.

Sam said...

Jeff, check this out. She's tasting the same wine. Apparently fire and flame is correct.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcIm-b0Rx_E

Jeff said...

Hey thanks for the tip.

Funny, I had one the Macchiarossa she was talking about too. http://www.vivalawino.com/2009/12/2005-cantine-cipressi-macchiarossa.html Actually liked it more than the Schioppettino. I also had another bottle of the Ermacora Schioppetino, which confirmed my thoughts on which one was better...