Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Domaine Jean-Claude Boisset Chambolle-Musigny 2002/Bernard Baudry Chinon "Les Grezeaux" 2007


Sarah and I always get our landlords a bottle of wine for Christmas. He and his wife are totally cool--definitely total bon vivants. Anyways, we brought them a bottle of 07 Telegramme Chateauneuf-du-Pape (for what's it worth, they gave Sarah and I a bottle of 07 Waters Syrah, which I'm super stoked to try) and they asked me if I wanted to come over for dinner, which was an offer that I couldn't refuse. Especially since they were like, "Oh yeah, I have an 02 Chambolle-Musigny open." I guess that's the way you roll when you have a wine cellar, are a nut for wine, and are retired. What they had open was the 2002 Domaine Jean-Claude Boisset Chambolle-Musigny; about 45$ or so. 02 was a great year in Burgundy, and although this is basically a village wine (as opposed to a premier cru or grand cru vineyard), it was really drinking nice. 7 years has been quite kind to this wine. A very elegant style, with raspberry fruit (reminded me a lot of my great grandmother's raspberry farm) still very clearly present and framed by notes of coffee/truffle/chocolate. Lithe and supple, this wine isn't what I would describe as a "powerhouse," in your face wine. Tannin still just peeking out in the background, but with snappy, sweet fruit, good acids, and a great finish. Of course, I don't know shit about Burgundy, but that shouldn't matter too much should it? Good wine is good wine. A We ate some portabello peppers, topped with onions, parika, and chorizo that were really good, and my landlords regaled me with tales of drinking 1947 Cheval Blanc and DRC at Taillevent in Paris. Yeah, they get to live the good life. Let's just say that they have some people in their lives that are well off. Gotta admit, I was a little jealous, but stories like that are super cool. My landlord has pretty much had the whole nine yards of really legendary wines (all sorts of 1961's, 1947's, 1982's, etc...the list goes on), and of course, he was waxing rhapsodically about 1947 Cheval Blanc, even at 7100 Euro a bottle.


Of course, I had to bring a bottle over too, and they're totally in to Cabernet Franc, so I brought over the 07 Benard Baudry Chinon "Les Grezeaux," which is imported by Kermit Lynch. I felt a little pedestrian about bringing this bottle given the conversation (haha), but everyone was a big fan of this. Good wine is good wine, afterall. 22$. Wow, what a killer wine. Actually, in my opinion, this held it's own against the Burgundy. Definitely sleeker and less funky than I imagined, to be honest, but there's a little bit of the cab franc thing lurking in the background. Loads of sour cherry, with a minerally, earthy, stony streak running in the background. Juicy fruit flavors, and perhaps a little bit thin--ie not a whole lot of structure, but drinking really well, with tons of presence and a whole lot of character. The landlords liked it too. Not as good as 05 or 06 Chinon that I have had--I guess 07 was a meh vintage--but this was rocking my world. A


And of course, by the bottom of both those wines, I was kind of in a "what the fuck mode," so I was brought over some Lagavulin, which is one my favorite Scotches. Becuase my landlord hadn't had it before. Of course, he brought something out that completely trumped the Lagavulin...21 Year Knockando (which is from Speyside). I've never even heard of this Scotch before, but that doesn't matter. Now my landlord doesn't drink Scotch at all, but he got a whole case of this from one of his former tenants that also didn't drink Scotch. Of course, he's always entertaining people so he just has it around for that purpose. This Scotch was distilled in 1975, so while my parents were in high school. What a trip. Seriously. Stuff like that trips me out. It's WAY older than I am. When he got this from the previous tenant, if you could find it, it was selling for around 180$ a bottle apparently. Doesn't look like anyone has this in the US that I could find online, although you can get this in the UK for 60 Pounds (about 150$). I'm guessing it's still around the same price. Lagavulin is damn good--I mean I like it a lot, and so do other people, or at least that's what I thought. The thing is, is that Lagavulin is damned good when you stick it up next to Laphroaig or something. But next to the Knockando? It's like drinking piss, ie, really not good. The Knockando is so smooth, so subtle, so appley, peary, fruity...it just blew me away. I've had some other old Scotch--25 Year Caol Ila, for instance, but this is another one of those things like Burgundy where I don't know a whole lot about it. For all I know, Knockando isn't that great when you compare it to other 21 Year Speyside Malts. Totally dangerous--you really could drink the whole bottle like it was apple juice. Just really amazing, at least to me. A+ And then, to add some more fuel to the fire, my landlord was telling me about going to Mexico with his son (whose my age) and he ended up tasting me on this amazing Tequila that they brought back. I don't know shit about Tequila either, but this was also rocking my world. About 50$ a bottle, El Tesoro de Don Filipe Reposado, had a ton of herbal, pepper, and coriander notes on the nose, and a lingering, lingering coriander pepper finish. Minutes long. Wow. I'm going to have to get a bottle of it. I guess it's owned by Jim Beam. Also insanely good. At this point, I left because with that Knockando and the Tequila and a bottle of Lagavulin on the table, that was about all I could take, becuase you know, I still work and stuff and have to get up in the morning. Oh, to be retired.  

5 comments:

jason said...

Nothing to add but really enjoyed the read. Good post and even better storytelling!

Jeff said...

Thank you very much. I really appreciate that. They are cool people and they are fun to hang out with, despite all the "wine envy" that ends up occurring...

CabFrancoPhile said...

Just opened the '07 Grezeaux tonight. Definitely an A in my book, too. Much better by far than any '07 I've tasted. Almost a fruit-bomb--by vintage and Chinon standards, at least. Totally agree with everything you say, except the thin part. Lighter bodied, yes, but thin gets abused by people who think syrupy wines are the norm. It's a connotation thing.

Definitely will be blogging this one up!

Jeff said...

Good point about thin. I really just meant that it didn't have as much structure, depth, etc, as some of the 06's or 05's that I've had. I see your point about syrup though. Lighter bodied is really what I meant. And yeah, isn't it funny that it's kind of a fruit bomb? I don't think that it loses anything that makes a Chinon good though, since it still keeps that earthy, stony edge. I think it's probably one of favorite wines that I had all year. I can't wait to try the Le Clos Guillot.

CabFrancoPhile said...

Totally Chinon. My girlfriend said "it's a terroir wine." Tastes like smashed rocks, has a bit of leafiness and earth.

I'm wanting to get some Clos Guillot seeing as it's only $2 more than Grezeaux. Since it comes from limestone & clay soil, it'll probably be even better.